Jean-Luc Marion (1946– ) (see also “Twentieth-century hermeneutics,” Chapter 16; “German philosophy (Heidegger, Gadamer, Apel),” Chapter 17; “French philosophy in the twentieth century,” Chapter 18). Roland Barthes was a twentieth-century French literary critic, philosopher, and cultural theorist important in the trajectories of structuralism and poststructuralism. It provides accessible surveys of the work of a number of important thinkers within and outside of the phenomenological tradition, including Henri Bergson, Léon Brunschvicg, Maurice Blondel, Édouard Le Roy and Lev Shestov, as well as a host of less well known figures. The ANU uses Turnitin to enhance student citation and referencing techniques, and to assess assignment submissions as a component of the University's approach to managing Academic Integrity. Looks at the phenomenological work of 20th century French thinker Michel Henry (1922-2002). Taking account of this background, together with the influences of avant-garde literature and German philosophy, he develops a rich account of existential phenomenology, which he argues is the central achievement of French thought during the century, and of subsequent structuralist and … In the 20th century, philosophy increasingly became professionalized as the period witnessed the development of a number of new philosophical schools including logical positivism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, and post-structuralism. He starts with the work of the Belgian neo-scholastic Léon Noël and Sorbonne philosopher Victor Delbos. If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. In the interwar period, the work of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and to a lesser extent Max Scheler began to … In a helpful if somewhat schematic account of late nineteenth century French philosophy, Dupont homes in on the impact of Bergson and Blondel. Twentieth-century hermeneutics / Nicholas Davey ; 17. Through readings of Kant, Husserl, Heidegger, Derrida, and twentieth-century French phenomenology (e.g., Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and Henry), it ventures a bold and decisive reappraisal of phenomenology and its possibilities. The Postmodern Explained pp 1-16Jean-Luc Nancy, The Inoperative Community - Author's prefaceJacques Derrida 'On Forgiveness' in On Cosmopolitanism and forgiveness. ... and speculating about the myriad texts lumped under the moniker "twentieth century French philosophy" may finally be sufficiently prepared to engage the complexities and nuances of Gasché's text. Further information for domestic and international students about tuition and other fees can be found at Fees. Phenomenology is commonly understood in either of two ways: as adisciplinary field in philosophy, or as a movement in the history ofphilosophy.The discipline of phenomenology may be defined initially as thestudy of structures of experience, or consciousness. The sheer scope of Dupont's research commands respect, and he shows great facility analyzing a large variety of philosophical traditions. Phenomenology is the branch of philosophy that explores phenomena (observable, experiential events) and has principally been the concern of German philosophers and 20th-century French philosophers. Twentieth-Century French Philosophy By Eric Matthews Oxford University Press, 1996 Read preview Overview Spinoza Contra Phenomenology: French Rationalism from Cavaillaes to Deleuze By Knox Peden Stanford University Press, 2014 Further, it is not clear that the sharp division between religious and secular thought that structures Dupont's account is really reflective of the messy world of French philosophy, and to his credit, Dupont follows his evidence even when it challenges his main argument. While the use of Turnitin is not mandatory, the ANU highly recommends Turnitin is used by both teaching staff and students. A number of abstracts and synopses throughout allow readers to orient themselves with ease. The burgeoning interest in phenomenology was a crucial factor in Husserl's 1929 invitation to Paris, where he gave lectures at the Sorbonne (later published as the Cartesian Meditations). Reviewed by Edward Baring, Drew University. Accessibility Information. Copyright © 2020 Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews In chapter three, Dupont tells the relatively familiar story of the reception of phenomenology in mainstream French philosophy between 1910 and 1939. While phenomenology has influenced some of the most important atheistic thinkers of the twentieth century, like Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sartre, it has also served as … Dupont identifies some interesting convergences between Husserl and Blondel, Bergson, Rousselot, and Le Roy, but is often less successful in showing that these figures did in fact lay the groundwork for the reception of phenomenology. Phenomenology was founded by Edmund Husserl and Alexander Pfänder at the beginning of the twentieth century. Jean-Francois Lyotard, 'Answering the Question What is Postmodernism?' Traditionally, Phenomenology has been elusive to link to Anthropology. Given that phenomenology has been a decisive precondition and persisting interlocutor for a … Phenomenology and the "Theological Turn" brings together in a single volume the debate over Dominique Janicaud's critique of the "theological turn" of French phenomenology as represented by the works of Emmanuel Levinas, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Lue Marion, Jean-Francois Courtine, Jean-Louis Chretien, and … As the book develops, Dupont expands upon this claim: he identifies both Aristotelian and Cartesian elements in Husserl's phenomenology and suggests that French religious thinkers concentrated on the former, while secular thinkers focused on the latter (296). French philosophy in the twentieth century / Gary Gutting ; Pt. Tuition fees are indexed annually. He was probably also the most famous, as a dramatist, screenwriter, novelist and critic. The relationship between phenomenology and religion has long been the subject of heated debate. The boundary fences that Dupont erects to mark out his subject, in particular that between "French philosophy" and "French religious thought," cause problems when they are made to do double duty as a thesis. Why is ISBN important? In placing too much confidence in such boundaries, Dupont tends to over-estimate both the homogeneity of the thought within and the differences across them. If you are a domestic graduate coursework or international student you will be required to pay tuition fees. One of the major figures of the early "philosophical" reception of Husserl was the Thomist Noël, who trained some of the figures on the other side, such as René Kremer, and whose work provided the occasion for Maritain's treatment of Husserl in The Degrees of Knowledge. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. Meanwhile for many religious thinkers, such as Daniel Feuling and Maritain, Husserl's close affinity with Descartes was the defining feature of his thought (285, 300). Hering after all appears in both halves of the book, first as a "French philosopher" and then as a "French religious thinker." Sartre (1905–1980) was, if only by birth, the first truly 20th-century French philosopher. Borders are important precisely where divisions are not secure. Two chapters are dedicated to the "precursors" of phenomenology. "Phenomenology and the Theological Turn: The French Debate brings together in a single volume the debate over Dominique Janicaud's critique of the "theological turn" of French phenomenology as represented by the works of Emmanuel Levinas, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Luc Marion, Jean-Francois Courtine, Jean-Louis Chretien, and Michel Henry." Consequently, German phenomenology shaped the work of some of the most recognizable figures of twentieth-century French thought. philosophy. A leading figure of the French Left, Sartre was opposed on his right by Raymond Aron. Methodology. Through readings of Kant, Husserl, Heidegger, Derrida, and twentieth-century French phenomenology (e.g., Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and Henry), it ventures a bold and decisive reappraisal of phenomenology and its possibilities. Critical Theory / Axel Honneth ; 19. The Australian National University, Canberra ... Phénoménologie et anthropologie phénoménologique. You can find your student contribution amount for each course at. In articles that stretched across the 1940s, Thao sought to employ the concrete insights of Marxism and dialectical materialism in order to correct and critique the dominant philosophical programs of phenomenology and existentialism. The connections Dupont finds between the work of Hering or Rabeau and Le Roy (e.g. Christian Dupont, Phenomenology in French Philosophy: Early Encounters, Springer, 2014, 338pp, $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789400746404. 221, 228, 244) for instance are often quite thin or speculative, and the connection drops out completely in discussions of neo-Thomists like Maritain (296). The impact of the other figures is even less clear. Phenomenology (from Greek phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience of self. Where there is a unit range displayed for this course, not all unit options below may be available. Shestov considered Husserl an unrepentant rationalist, tying philosophy too closely to science, and thus excluding the irrational elements of reality. ISBN-13: 978-0945996002. What was distinctive in these cases, however, was that they figured intuition in a way that pointed towards the divine, and thus they provided a model of thinking through the ways in which phenomenology could be applied to religious questions. CRICOS Provider : 00120C The course will both aim to provide an overview of post-WW2 French philosophy and focus selectively on two or three of its most important representatives, for instance Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Blanchot, Levinas, Derrida, Lyotard, Nancy or Badiou. The assumption of homogeneity within the various boundaries motivates the chapters on phenomenological precursors, for it is only by showing parallel developments in France, Dupont suggests, that we can understand how phenomenology took root there. The dangers posed by phenomenology were thrust to the forefront of the Catholic mind thanks to a debate over “critical realism.” In a 1930 article the French historian of philosophy Étienne Gilson developed a searing criticism of Noël’s philosophical work, … Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss phenomenology, a style of philosophy developed by the German thinker Edmund Husserl in the first decades of the 20th century… Dupont distinguishes (in his terms) "French philosophy" from "French religious thought," and treats them separately. Dupont provides illuminating and rich accounts of the various receptions, giving us a flavor of the debates, arguments, and anxieties that accompanied the reading of Husserlian phenomenology by theologians and religious thinkers. (5). Georges Bataille: Phenomenology and Phantasmatology. Responsible Officer: Registrar, Student Administration / Page Contact: Website Administrator / Frequently Asked Questions, +61 2 6125 5111 The course will both aim to provide an overview of … Published earlier this year in the prestigious Phaenomenologica series, it is a lightly modified version of Dupont's 1997 dissertation, which has been an important reference for almost all the other scholars working on the topic. This course offers an introduction to contemporary French philosophy focusing on the way in which the themes of love, freedom and death appear in thought, about language, meaning and being as well as in ethics and politics. Love Death and Freedom (20th Century French Phenomenology), Love Death and Freedom (20th Century French Phenomenology) (. 130 hours of total student learning time made up from: a) 36 hours of contact over 12 weeks: 24 hours of lectures, and 12 hours of tutorials; and, If you are an undergraduate student and have been offered a Commonwealth supported place, your fees are set by the Australian Government for each course. Dupont undertakes a similar analysis at the beginning of the second part of the book, examining the work of Le Roy and Pierre Rousselot, who helped promote Bergsonian and Blondelian themes in French theological circles. Deleuze & Derrida) Magdalena Figiel (ABD) These two chapters on phenomenological precursors set up the main analyses of the book. Christian Dupont, Phenomenology in French Philosophy: Early Encounters, Springer, 2014, 338pp, $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789400746404. This structure reflects Dupont's major claim: the two receptions of phenomenology were "distinct," and proceeded independently of each other. To enrol in this course you must have completed 12 Units of Philosophy (PHIL) Courses, or with permission of the convenor. These boundaries delimit the topic of the book, but a further boundary divides it down the middle. The dynamics of this reception has attracted the interest of numerous intellectual historians and philosophers over the past fifteen years, and a vibrant field of scholarly inquiry has emerged. "The conventional understanding of twentieth-century French thought is just beginning to fracture, and we are now coming to appreciate the complexity and significance of intellectual trends that once-dominant schools―such as phenomenology and existentialism, structuralism and post-structuralism―have too long obscured. In the interwar period, the work of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, and to a lesser extent Max Scheler began to find traction west of the Rhine, where it proved to be a critical stimulus to philosophical renewal. --Jacket. The French reception of German phenomenology was the result of one of the most consequential border crossings in modern intellectual history. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). As Dupont suggests, In the case of French philosophers, their interest in phenomenology was encouraged by the interpretation of phenomenology as a continuation of the Cartesian tradition, that is, as an attempt to secure the foundations of science and logic through reflection upon consciousness. ISSN: 1538 - 1617 Dupont’s book is an impressively researched contribution to the literature, providing fine-grained readings of a range of texts. Phenomenology is a philosophical tradition or movement of the first half of the 20th Century, developed largely by the German philosophers Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, which is based on the premise that reality consists of objects and events ("phenomena") as they are perceived or understood in the human consciousness, and not of anything independent of human consciousness. Dissertation: "A Phenomenology of Religious Conversion" (directed by Dr. James Swindal); 19th- and 20th-century French and German philosophy: Epistemology, Phenomenology: Gaia Ferrari : German Idealism (esp. It is a guiding principle of the book that there is "no reception without receptivity" (7), and consequently Dupont scans pre-War French thought for suggestive parallels with phenomenology that might explain why it found such fertile ground there. This study carefully considers the unfolding of a "new phenomenology" in Henry's work, and in its various dimensions: in being situated within the Western philosophical tradition, especially in its relation to Heidegger's critique of onto-theology. Professor of Philosophy, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1963–71. Interestingly, the philosophy of the 20th century is known as contemporary philosophy. More extensive treatments of Husserl's phenomenology would have to wait until the 1920s, and the debate between Lev Shestov and Jean Hering over Husserl's rationalism. Hering defended Husserl from this criticism, arguing that he promoted intuition above reason (114). Sartre popularized (and named) existentialism, making it better known to the lay-person than, for instance, deconstruction. The book will thus be an aid for scholars, and it is written so that readers can dip in and read individual sections depending on their interest. He also restricts himself temporally, stopping in 1939. Dupont's book is a clear and readable account of a complex moment, and can serve as an introduction to French philosophy more generally in the first half of the twentieth century. "The conventional understanding of twentieth-century French thought is just beginning to fracture, and we are now coming to appreciate the complexity and significance of intellectual trends that once-dominant schools—such as phenomenology and existentialism, structuralism and post-structuralism—have too long obscured. Demonstrate familiarity with some of the major themes of contemporary French thought and  contemporary ideas in French philosophy that emerge out of a critical engagement with the philosophical tradition; Develop techniques for engaging with challenging reading and going deeper into the insights and problems it poses; Relate the theoretical debates in the texts studied to current ethical and political questions; and. Twentieth-century moral philosophy / Rowland Stout ; 21. Hegel), 20th Century French Philosophy, Phenomenology (esp. Love Death and Freedom (20th Century French Phenomenology) An undergraduate course offered by the School of Philosophy. The French Husserl was thus cleaved in two, with each half following a different trajectory. Christian Dupont's book is the latest instantiation of, and a precursor to, this literature. The French reception of German phenomenology was the result of one of the most consequential border crossings in modern intellectual history. Phenomenology and Marxism were two other key concerns of his. Husserl's lectures foregrounded the association between his work and Descartes's, and this directs Dupont's attention in the final part of the chapter: an analysis of Levinas's and Sartre's reading of Husserl. Changes to Class Summaries not captured by this publication will be available to enrolled students via Wattle. Le Roy wanted a return to a primitive intuition, a "method of immanence" that reaches beyond the constructions of science to get at the "original intuitive sources of knowledge" (179). Breaking with the prevailing picture of existentialism and phenomenology at the time, it has become one of the landmark works of twentieth-century thought. The same is true for the claim about the Descartes/Aristotle split. Dupont singles out for comment those aspects of their work that approached Husserl's intuition, a "descriptive inventory of the contents of consciousness," which preceded and perhaps undermined the pretensions of the positivistic sciences (15). German philosophy (Heidegger, Gadamer, Apel) / Karl-Otto Apel ; 18. Set alongside the more general and accessible introductions by Bernard Groethuysen and Georges Gurvitch from the end of that decade, these debates presented French philosophers with a fuller and sympathetic picture of phenomenology. Dupont examines here the religious reception of Husserlian phenomenology in France, reading in turn the liberal Protestant Hering, the Catholic Apologist Gaston Rabeau, and Thomists as diverse as Joseph Maréchal and Jacques Maritain. The interest of French religious thinkers, on the other hand, was incited largely by the desire to break from the strict rationalism that Cartesianism represented among French academic philosophers. In the French philosophy section of the book, Descartes does not emerge as a central player until the last section treating Levinas and Sartre, and even then, Levinas explicitly rejected the Cartesian priority of the subject, which Dupont interprets as a sign of his proximity to the "Aristotelian" Blondel (86). Along with Husserl's Ideas and Heidegger's Being and Time, Being Given is one of the classic works of phenomenology in the twentieth century. Far more than the positivism, idealism, or spiritualism, which ruled the roost in the period, it was the innovations of these two thinkers, according to Dupont, that made phenomenology recognizable and attractive in the French context. First, he focuses almost entirely on the reception of Husserl, discussing Scheler and Heidegger only when that is necessary for the task (10). Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to: This course may be counted towards the European Studies major. For additional information regarding Turnitin please visit the ANU Online website. An undergraduate course offered by the School of Philosophy. Phenomenology, a philosophical movement originating in the 20th century, the primary objective of which is the direct investigation and description of phenomena as consciously experienced, without theories about their causal explanation and as free as possible from unexamined preconceptions and presuppositions. In such situations, they are less descriptions of neatly ordered states of affairs than the recognition that order has to be imposed. In response to COVID-19: Please note that Semester 2 Class Summary information (available under the classes tab) is as up to date as possible. Author of The Phenomenological Movement. Phenomenology of religion is distinct from historical, sociological, anthropological, philosophical, and theological approaches to the study of religion. ISBN-10: 0945996004. V. Politics, ethics, and aesthetics ; 20. Published: April 23, 2013. Indeed, even the relationship to Bergson, which has been long recognized by scholars as a central factor in early readings of Husserl, is, as Dupont admits, attested by remarkably little textual evidence (54, 94-5). It falters, however, when it tries to draw broader conclusions. At ANU 1 EFTSL is 48 units (normally 8 x 6-unit courses). The French reception of phenomenology is, of course, a huge topic, and Dupont begins his discussion by staking out his territory. Indeed though discussing it as a form of religious thought, Dupont admits that Thomists engaged with phenomenology primarily "as a philosophy rather than as a theology" (297). Merleau-Ponty), Post-Structuralism (esp. Both were, Dupont argues, marked by the thought of Bergson and Blondel, but they diverged in the way they understood Husserl's relationship to Descartes. Meta-Hodos and Meta Meta-Hodos: A Phenomenology of 20th Century Musical Materials and an Approach to the Study of Form 2nd Edition by James Tenney (Author) 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 rating. ABN : 52 234 063 906. Both identified Husserl's criticism of psychologism in the first volume of the Logical Investigations as the most important aspect of his work. Tuition fees are for the academic year indicated at the top of the page. For this reason, what is valuable about Dupont's book is not the sharp lines that inform its argument, but the rich research that refuses to be contained within them. ISBN. Chapter five forms the heart of the book, and will be of most interest to scholars of phenomenology. Rousselot tried to move beyond simple "rational thinking" to get to the intellect, direct intuitive knowledge, which according to him was at the heart of Aquinas's thought (191). College of Arts and Letters Show intellectual discrimination, the ability to pick out key points and to construct an argument/interpretation. This chapter examines the development of phenomenology in France in the last part of the twentieth century, especially the “radical” or “excessive” turn of phenomenology in such thinkers as Michel Henry, Jean-Luc Marion, Jean-Louis Chrétien, Jean-Yves Lacoste, and Emmanuel Falque (with special focus on Henry and Marion as the foremost representatives of this movement). You can find your student contribution amount for each course at Fees. Literally,phenomenology is the For this is a book about how ideas cross borders, and it is only appropriate that the borders that Dupont erects himself should show themselves to be equally permeable. This course offers an introduction to contemporary French philosophy focusing on the way in which the themes of love, freedom and death appear in thought, about language, meaning and being as well as in ethics and politics. The Vietnamese philosopher Tran Duc Thao exerted an important influence over the development of 20th century French philosophy. First published in 1945, Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s monumental Phénoménologie de la perception signalled the arrival of a major new philosophical and intellectual voice in post-war Europe. There are no current offerings for this course.